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Organ Transplantation

Jean Emond, MD
Chief, Transplantation Services
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/
Columbia University Medical Center

NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital's pediatric transplantation program provides comprehensive management of children with acute or chronic organ failure. Through the combined expertise of physicians specializing in the medical care of transplant patients, highly skilled transplant surgeons and pediatric surgeons, and a specially trained nursing team that coordinates all aspects of transplant care, the pediatric transplantation program achieves outstanding success rates for pediatric heart, liver, lung, renal, and small bowel transplant. Of vital importance is our dedicated focus on all aspects of pediatric care made possible by the close collaboration among staff of the Transplant Division, Department of Pediatric General Surgery, and the Department of Pediatrics. In addition, our program provides psychosocial support to all members of the child's family.

A particular strength of our pediatric transplantation program is the ability to bring together multiple medical and surgical specialists renowned in their own fields to provide care for children with severe malformations or overlapping conditions. In August 2007, our team successfully transplanted, in a single procedure, five organs in an eight-month-old boy. A liver, small bowel, pancreas, colon, and stomach were transplanted during the seven-hour operation, called multi-visceral transplantation-a complex procedure that is rarely performed and requires superb medical and surgical coordination. The boy, who was born with total intestinal atresia, a rare malformation of the entire gastrointestinal tract that makes nutrition possible only by artificial means, was able to return home within weeks.

By transplanting several organs at once, we can give children with serious intestinal malformations or infections hope for a healthy future. The Intestinal Failure Program at Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital has managed nearly 100 patients with devastating intestinal problems in recent years. The team includes dedicated specialists in pediatric surgery and transplantation; pediatric gastrointestinal medicine and nutrition; advanced practice nursing; and child life and social support services. This range of services, essential to helping these children and their families cope with overwhelming health problems, is only available at a world's leading children's hospital.

Our physicians first employ all viable therapies to avoid the need for transplantation. But if transplantation becomes necessary, medical and surgical teams prepare patients to be in the most optimal physical condition to undergo the transplant and achieve the best chance of success. We believe it is all about teamwork at every phase of care. We partner with specialists throughout the Hospital, including the intensive care unit, interventional radiology, and nutrition, to name a few. Our transplant teams meet at least twice a week to confer on each case to ensure progress and address any clinical, patient, or family concerns. These teams closely follow patients after transplant, managing immunosuppression issues and providing a lifetime of care.

As part of an academic medical center, we are able to care for children with complex and critical conditions, offering them access to current clinical trials and state-of-the-art transplantation techniques and medical management. Our results are some of the best in the country in terms of low complication rates and greater patient survival.

From evaluation to postoperative follow-up, patients receive a seamless integration of multidisciplinary services that deliver the comprehensive and consistent care necessary for their well-being.

Conditions leading to transplantation include:

Heart Transplant
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Complex congenital heart disease
  • Congestive heart failure
Liver Transplant
  • Acute liver failure
  • Alagille syndrome
  • Alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency
  • Ascites
  • Biliary atresia
  • Cholestasis
  • Cirrhosis
  • Hepatitis
  • Hepatoblastoma
  • Hepatomegaly
  • Jaundice
  • Liver disease
  • Liver injury
  • Liver tumor
  • Neonatal hepatitis
  • Portal hypertension
  • Portal vein thrombosis
  • Splenomegaly
  • Tyrosinemia
  • Variceal bleeding
  • Wilson's disease
Lung Transplant
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Focal nodular hyperplasia
Small Bowel Transplant
  • Gastroschisis
  • Ileal atresia
  • Intestinal atresia
  • Intestinal pseudo-obstruction
  • Jejunal atresia
  • Malabsorption
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC)
  • Short bowel syndrome (SBS)
  • Volvulus
Renal Transplant
  • Pediatric end-stage renal disease
  • Pediatric kidney failure

Descriptions for each of these conditions can be found by clicking on the Health A to Z library in the right hand column.

Contact

Pediatric Organ Transplantation
Directions
(800) 543-2782
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